Broadclub Cuttlefish uses camouflage to avoid becoming a large lunch!

September 16, 2020  •  1 Comment

Master of camouflage to hide from predators that might want a large lunch. Not only do they change colors to elude predators such as dolphins, sharks, fish, seals, seabirds, and other cuttlefish. They also change the texture of their skin to mimic the color of the coral and the texture of the coral they are cruising over. From smooth skinned bronze to lumpy bumpy grey/white/ tan. When threatened by predators, the crafty cuttlefish produce ink that confuses the potential predators and allows the cuttlefish to escape. Any individuals that do not immediately escape can perfectly mimic the color and texture of the ink (called sepia), in an attempt to hide in plain sight.  Long ago, this dark-brown ink was used for writing and drawing.

Broadclub Cuttlefish - sepia latimanusBroadclub Cuttlefish - sepia latimanusThe Broadclub Cuttlefish gets its common name from the wide pads on the ends of its feeding tentacles that it uses to capture prey. This species is the second largest cuttlefish, reaching weights of at least 22 pounds (10 kg). Up to 20 inches long (50 cm) including tentacles. It has eight arms and two feeding tentacles. This cunning predator hypnotizes prey with flashing, colored bands that ripple along its skin. Color variations for camouflage to deter predators.Location: Pacific Indian Ocean, Labuan Bajo Flores, Sebayur Island, Indonesia. September 2019.

Predator: The Broadclub Cuttlefish gets its common name from the wide pads on the ends of its two largest clubbed arms fanout at angles from the body. The two feeding tentacles do the striking, initial grabbing of prey and guiding the food to their beaked mouths. In addition, they flash several colors and waves of light toward their prey, apparently to hypnotize it. What do cuttlefish eat? They eat small mollusks, crabs, shrimp, fish, octopus, worms, and other cuttlefish.

Size: One of the hypnotic heavyweights in the cuttlefish family, the Broadclub is the second-largest cuttlefish species. This species reaches weights of up to 22 pounds (10kg) and up to 20 inches in length (50cm) including tentacles.  Broadclub Cuttlefish - sepia latimanusBroadclub Cuttlefish - sepia latimanusThe Broadclub Cuttlefish gets its common name from the wide pads on the ends of its feeding tentacles that it uses to capture prey. This species is the second largest cuttlefish, reaching weights of at least 22 pounds (10 kg). Up to 20 inches long (50 cm) including tentacles. It has eight arms and two feeding tentacles. This cunning predator hypnotizes prey with flashing, colored bands that ripple along its skin. Color variations for camouflage to deter predators. Location: Pacific Indian Ocean, Labuan Bajo Flores, Sebayur Island, Indonesia. September 2019.

Body structure and mobility: An outer shell once covered the cuttlefish's body but has since evolved into a porous internal shell called a cuttlebone. The cuttlefish varies its buoyancy by varying the amount gas and liquid held in the holes of the shell. A cuttlefish moves by undulating a delicate fringe that runs along its entire body. This thin, fragile fringe is an odd source of mobility for a sea creature this size; like putting a tutu skirt on a tank. But for a quick getaway it expels a forceful stream of water through its siphon.

 

 


Comments

Aixa Schwartz(non-registered)
Very interesting creature , it is amazing how they could protect themselves from predators in a very deceiving way !
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